Mr. Jahn Does It All

By Kareem Ibrahim ‘18

A jack of all trades, Mr. Cameron Jahn teaches a diverse body of chemistry and robotics students while maintaining several important duties in the school.

“I teach AutoCad, AP Chem, and I prepare the regents chemistry labs,” said Mr. Jahn, “Before I’ve taught the whole gambit of robotics courses, lab, conceptual physics, and regents chemistry.”

Mr. Jahn is also responsible for maintaining the safety devices in lab, such as the emergency showers.

Mr. Jahn received a bachelor’s degree in chemistry and a masters degree in education. His education was particularly fluid as he attended high school in Alaska, the University of Washington in Seattle for his undergraduate degree, and Pace University in Manhattan for his graduate degree. Mr. Jahn’s Teaching Fellows program led him to teach in Brooklyn.

“Science I’ve always been interested in, chemistry in particular,” said Mr. Jahn, “Pretty early on I decided I wanted to teach chemistry. Midwood is the only school I’ve ever taught, at least during the regular year,” in which Mr. Jahn is referring to a program he taught in over the summer.

“I considered an English degree first actually,” said Mr. Jahn, “But I prefer the more objectivity that you get with science questions. Reading and grading essays was just never up my alley.”

Mr. Jahn has shown that he cares about all of his students and greatly enjoys teaching. He said he has seen many of his students go to engineering schools, medical schools, and even some to go to Ivy League schools .

“Even for students who aren’t necessarily academically successful, I still find it rewarding to teach those kids,” said Mr. Jahn.

Samanda Qiu ‘19, a student in his AP Chemistry class, said, “In my opinion, Mr. Jahn is a wonderful teacher who enjoys teaching. He tries to push us past our limits for critical thinking, and although it may seem stressful now, we all know that he did it for a good cause. In his class, he educates us and occasionally jokes around as well, which makes me feel comfortable in the class.”

Along with his chemistry and lab workload, Mr. Jahn was asked to teach the newly found robotics education course in 2007.

“I didn’t know anything about robotics until the principal asked me, and I said ‘Why not?’” said Mr. Jahn. “I had no prior experience with robotics or programming, and since then, I’ve been a self-taught roboticist.”

The year after, Mr. Jahn created the school’s current robotics teams, Botley Crue, Pink Droyds, and The Rolling Drones, in which he came up with the idea to make them all named after classic rock bands.

Mr. Jahn is a very nice and good teacher,” said Mohammad Ishtiaq ‘17, the captain of Pink Droyds in AutoCad, “He isn’t like other teachers where everything must be done with his knowledge. He lets the kids explore and use their knowledge and lets them learn what is good and bad. Being able to let us as young engineers learn and develop our skills over building robots and coding is a very good gift that was giving to us and I couldn’t ask for a better teacher than Mr. Jahn.”

Mr. Jahn at the moment is focusing on his upcoming Robotics tournaments, in which they had their first one January 14 where two teams qualified.

“Our next tournament is January 19 in Manhattan and our regional tournament is January 26 in Queens.” said Mr. Jahn.

Students may apply to AP Chemistry, in which both Mr. Jahn and Ms. Shaniece Mosely teach,  in the spring after the completion of a regular chemistry course. Applications to AutoCad also open up in the spring as an extension of the Med-Sci pre-engineering track after the student’s completion of the Mechatronics class.

A jack of all trades, Mr. Cameron Jahn teaches a diverse body of chemistry and robotics students while maintaining several important duties in the school.

“I teach AutoCad, AP Chem, and I prepare the regents chemistry labs,” said Mr. Jahn, “Before I’ve taught the whole gambit of robotics courses, lab, conceptual physics, and regents chemistry.”

Mr. Jahn is also responsible for maintaining the safety devices in lab, such as the emergency showers.

Mr. Jahn received a bachelor’s degree in chemistry and a masters degree in education. His education was particularly fluid as he attended high school in Alaska, the University of Washington in Seattle for his undergraduate degree, and Pace University in Manhattan for his graduate degree. Mr. Jahn’s Teaching Fellows program led him to teach in Brooklyn.

“Science I’ve always been interested in, chemistry in particular,” said Mr. Jahn, “Pretty early on I decided I wanted to teach chemistry. Midwood is the only school I’ve ever taught, at least during the regular year,” in which Mr. Jahn is referring to a program he taught in over the summer.

“I considered an English degree first actually,” said Mr. Jahn, “But I prefer the more objectivity that you get with science questions. Reading and grading essays was just never up my alley.”

Mr. Jahn has shown that he cares about all of his students and greatly enjoys teaching. He said he has seen many of his students go to engineering schools, medical schools, and even some to go to Ivy League schools .

“Even for students who aren’t necessarily academically successful, I still find it rewarding to teach those kids,” said Mr. Jahn.

Samanda Qiu ‘19, a student in his AP Chemistry class, said, “In my opinion, Mr. Jahn is a wonderful teacher who enjoys teaching. He tries to push us past our limits for critical thinking, and although it may seem stressful now, we all know that he did it for a good cause. In his class, he educates us and occasionally jokes around as well, which makes me feel comfortable in the class.”

Along with his chemistry and lab workload, Mr. Jahn was asked to teach the newly found robotics education course in 2007.

“I didn’t know anything about robotics until the principal asked me, and I said ‘Why not?’” said Mr. Jahn. “I had no prior experience with robotics or programming, and since then, I’ve been a self-taught roboticist.”

The year after, Mr. Jahn created the school’s current robotics teams, Botley Crue, Pink Droyds, and The Rolling Drones, in which he came up with the idea to make them all named after classic rock bands.

Mr. Jahn is a very nice and good teacher,” said Mohammad Ishtiaq ‘17, the captain of Pink Droyds in AutoCad, “He isn’t like other teachers where everything must be done with his knowledge. He lets the kids explore and use their knowledge and lets them learn what is good and bad. Being able to let us as young engineers learn and develop our skills over building robots and coding is a very good gift that was giving to us and I couldn’t ask for a better teacher than Mr. Jahn.”

Mr. Jahn at the moment is focusing on his upcoming Robotics tournaments, in which they had their first one January 14 where two teams qualified.

“Our next tournament is January 19 in Manhattan and our regional tournament is January 26 in Queens.” said Mr. Jahn.

Students may apply to AP Chemistry, in which both Mr. Jahn and Ms. Shaniece Mosely teach,  in the spring after the completion of a regular chemistry course. Applications to AutoCad also open up in the spring as an extension of the Med-Sci pre-engineering track after the student’s completion of the Mechatronics class.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this:
search previous next tag category expand menu location phone mail time cart zoom edit close