Swim Team Trains Physically, Mentally

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Matthew Pero ’16 does the butterfly stroke.

By Sam Hoque ’17 and Orts Lamroe ’17

On your mark, get set, swim! The swimming team is in season and its members are training themselves both physically and mentally. The swimming team isn’t just something you join, it’s an experience.

Staying in shape outside of practice is crucial for winning in the water, Marcus Chan ’17 said. “It is essential that we are well enough to swim so that we can contribute to the team by swimming our best in meets against other schools. ”

The swimming team’s practice routine forces one to maintain prime physical condition.

“Practice is extremely tiring at some points to the event of shortage of breath, weak body, low stamina as well as vomiting in some cases, ” said Mitch Mui ’17. Mitch knows the difficulty of the team’s training all too well and tries his best to maintain a healthy diet and exercise.

One exercise, “The Hundred,” requires swimmers to swim a twenty five foot long pool four times. It demands endurance and stamina, and is drilled five times at every practice.

As student-athletes, swimmers must uphold certain academic standards. A minimum of five passing classes is necessary to participate and compete. “It seems easy but it’s really not because practice takes up so much free time that I could’ve used to do extra studying, ” said Mui ’17.

Making use of a planner is a practical method of balancing team duties and daily life. Sometimes student-athletes feel overwhelmed by challenges outside of the swimming pool. According to the article “Blending sport and study — time management” by Justine Whipper from http://www.ausport.gov.au/, free time should be utilized accordingly. For example, instead of walking home, a student-athlete should consider hitting the books and reviewing notes in their school library. Completing assignments in small increments and having an outline of upcoming assignment due dates has the potential to greatly reduce stress.

The swimming team forces you to really manage your priorities. It is in no way easy and only certain people can handle the difficulty. The team exerts both physical and mental stress on swimmers as they push to achieve a higher caliber performance. Many of those who decide to join the team usually quit because they are not prepared for the challenges presented as student-athletes. But those who are able to deal with the stress end up becoming part of a big family that they never thought existed. Being on the team is taxing but each and every one of its members don’t regret joining. The skills and friendships that one obtains from joining the team will last a lifetime.

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