Maker Faire Sparks Creativity

By Xiao Ying Huang ’16 and Jocelyn Chen ’16

Three dimensional (3D) printers, a mechanical horse, a 28 feet robot, and life-size mouse traps were just some of the scientific makings that were displayed at the 6th Annual Maker Faire.

“It was an awe inspiring experience which triggered my creative genius,” said Zainab Salahudin ’17.

         Thousands of people joined the Maker Movement on September 26 and 27 at the New York Hall of Science in Queens to experience the tech-influenced Do It Yourself (DIY) community. According to eventbrite.com, there were two ticket options: single day passes and weekend passes. Tickets ranged from $30-$80 for adults (18 and up) and $20-$50 for youth and students (ages 3-17).

Junior and Senior Research students were given the opportunity to volunteer for extra credit and experience Maker Faire for free. According to Mr. Glenn Elert, research teacher, a total of 16 seniors, 10 juniors, and three alumni participated.

“I volunteered last year for extra credit and believed it was a valuable experience so there was nothing to lose volunteering again this year,” said Michelle Do ’16.

Volunteers had jobs that included: helping out at the Maker Camp, giving out safety waivers, assisting makers, and providing information. Volunteer shifts ranged between four to five hours.

“I enjoyed volunteering at Maker Faire,” said Wensi Wu ’17. “I got a free pass and many benefits such as a passport with my picture and a T-shirt.   

            People were welcomed by a 28 feet tall robot that was made from 95 percent airplane parts and had head and arms that emitted fire. It took its maker, Shane Evans, seven months to complete the masterpiece that weighed approximately 870 pounds.

“It’s very inspiring to see someone take something so ordinary and make a complex machine out of it,” said Salahudin.

With a total of six zones, one more than last year, there were activities for all age groups. Children, youth, and adults were able to engage in craft and hands-on activities, drone races, and enjoy scientific musical performances played by a fire organ. Visitors were able to participate in these activities with an activity wristband, which were obtained from some of the volunteers and information tents.

Mie Abouelkheir ’16 presented a workshop on the forces of flights and catapults in Zone 4 and represented the Intrepid Sea, Air, and Space Museum. She received the opportunity to present in Maker Faire because she was an Intrepid Teen.

“I really enjoyed teaching and seeing parents and their children interact with each other and learn from each other,” said Abouelkheir. “It also helped me practice my public speaking skills.”

Maker Faire has grown throughout the years and can be found throughout the world. The original maker faire began with approximately 50,000 people and the amount increases every year.

Maker Faire continues to expand and become known throughout the world. According to makerfaire.com, there are Maker Faires in Tokyo, Rome, Detroit, Oslo and Shenzhen.

“It’s a great event for showing off ideas for constructing,” said Mr. Elert.

Fire-blowing robot at Maker Faire.
Fire-blowing robot at Maker Faire.

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