Common Core Standards Meet Opposition

By Areeg Naeem, Helen Wong , Saba Sakhi, Phoebe Carney ’15

In many kindergarten classrooms, children are now mechanically bubbling in answers on a sheet rather than learning to think. This is what the Common Core standards offer to the education of our generation. Although the common Core has been hailed as a new, rigorous education reform, many agree that it’s all downhill from here.

The Common Core is inadequate in determining a student’s ability to do well in school. According to the Washington Post editorial, “The Common Core’s Fundamental trouble,” the Common Core Standards have never been fully implemented nor tested in real schools and are similar to the flawed No Child Left Behind reform. This is history repeating itself, but no one is taking any action against these unnecessary standards because he believed that it had “extreme serious failings” and reflected “very low expectations.”

Furthermore, the Common Core Standards are not only troubling to students and teachers, but the Common Core has also caused uneasiness among its own validation committee. In the Washington Post editorial, “The Common Core’s Fundamental Trouble,” Standford University Emeritus Mathematics Professor, R. James Milgram is the only mathematician on the validation committee. Even he refused to sign the final draft of the Common Core Standards because he believed that it had “extreme serious failings” and reflected “very low expectations.”

Although the Common Core represents tougher learning standards that develop a child’s critical learning skills, it places great stress upon students thus decreasing their level of performance in school. Moreover, the implementation of the places great stress upon students thus decreasing their level of performance in school. Moreover, the implementation of the Common Core has severly affected students since it does not take into consideration that each student learns differently. According to the Wall Street Journal article  “Common Core Education is Uncommonly Inadequate” by Jamie Gass and Charles Chieppo, Common Core’s English standards reduced the amount of classic literature, poetry, and drama that students will read by 60%, compared to former educational standards. This is upsetting as these genres are the foundation of the English curriculum and enhance a student’s vocabulary.

The Common Core Standards are a uniform set of rules that threaten to stifle creativity and innovation. In a New York Times editorial,” Are Kids Too Coddled,” a parent complained that “there was no room for imagination or play. All the kids were stressed out.” Although the Common Core was put in effect with the good intention of raising academic standards of our students, it has failed to do so. According to http://www.washingtonpolicy.org /publications/notes/why-common-core-bad-america, the website, there is no sufficient evidence that proves that national standards lead to higher and better academic results.

Needless to say, the Common Core has taken its toll upon both students and teachers. Instead of trying to restrict originality and creativity, the government should enact a policy that offers a variety of teaching methods that allows students to easily learn and absorb the information. Not only are the teachers more comfortable, but the students each have an opportunity to excel in their academics. The Common Core was first implemented to include a more rigorous curriculum, which would increase our national standards, but has failed tremendously. If the main purpose of the Common Core is to create a national standard to match those of other high performing countries, why not adopt their standards? According to http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/education/july-dec13/pisa, East Asian countries ranked near the top of a 2012 survey in comparing the academic results of 65 countries. The United States ranked near the middle of the pact. This just goes to show that the Common Core Standards are indeed a flawed system; a system that deteriorates the education of America.

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